Douglas R. May

Professor
Primary office:
785-864-7520
Capitol Federal Hall
Room 4124
University of Kansas


Summary

Academic Areas

Organizational Behavior

Current Activities

Research Activities and Honors :

Professor May's research interests include topics in business ethics (e.g., moral efficacy, moral courage, moral meaningfulness, and moral identity) and positive organizational scholarship (e.g., meaningfulness, job crafting, thriving and engagement at work). Professor May was awarded funding for his research on job design from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and awarded a three-year National Science Foundation (NSF) grant with KU colleagues to conduct research on ethics education. His work with Brenda Flannery on environmental ethical decision-making won the 1999 Academy of Management ONE Division's Best Paper Award and his research with Cheryl Rathert and Ghadir Ishqaidef received the 2008 Academy of Management HCM Division’s Best Paper Award. Finally, his theoretical work on ethical decision-making with Sean Hannah and Bruce Avolio received the 2012 Guy O. and Rosa Lee Mabry Best Paper Award at the University of Kansas. Professor May's articles have appeared in such journals as the Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, Journal of Business Ethics, Business & Society, Leadership Quarterly, Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Human Resource Management, Organizational Dynamics, and others. He has presented his research at over eighty-five international, national, and regional academic conferences.

Teaching Activities and Honors :

Professor May has taught courses in organizational behavior, business ethics, responsible conduct in research, and organizational theory at the undergraduate, masters, doctoral, and executive levels. Currently, he regularly teaches Mgmt 807 - Ethical decision-making in Business, Bus 903 – Responsible Conduct in Research, and Mgmt 953 – Designing Effective Work Environments in Organizations. He is also working to infuse the discussion of business ethics throughout the curriculum in the KU School of Business. He has been recognized many times for his instruction in the classroom. In 2003, Professor May received the university-level Nebraska Teacher Recognition Award. He was also a finalist for both the 2001 and 1998 NU system-wide Outstanding Teaching and Instructional Creativity Award. Professor May received UNL's 1997 College Distinguished Teaching Award, CBA's 1996-1997 Distinguished Teaching Award, and the 1993 Teaching Recognition Award for Contributions to Students from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Teaching Council. He received a Faculty Fellowship from the UNL Teaching Council to participate in the AAHE Peer Review of Teaching Project. Finally, Professor May served as Co-Chair of UNL's Teaching Council for the 1999-2000 academic year.

Service Activities and Honors :

Professor May currently directs activities associated with the International Center for Ethics in Business. He has worked with H. Joseph Reitz and Richard De George to conduct curriculum development workshops for faculty and graduate students on international business ethics as well as for science and engineering faculty from KU, KSU, and UMKC. He worked with students in the KU School of Business to establish the positive code of conduct, RESPECT, and coordinates the selection of recipients of this award each year. Professor May has used his research expertise and business experience at IBM to consult on job and work environment changes with organizations in health care, manufacturing, telecommunications, and government. He presents seminars on business ethics for executive education programs. Professor May is a member of the Academy of Management, Midwest Academy of Management, International Association for Business and Society, and the Society for Business Ethics. He served previously on the Academy of Management's Advisory Council and the Social Issues in Management Division's Research Committee. He has been an invited speaker on publishing, theory development, and research funding at both the SIM and HR Doctoral Consortia of the Academy and served as co-chair for both the 2004 and 2005 SIM Doctoral Consortia. Professor May has also been active in the governance of the Midwest Academy of Management, serving as its President in 2000 and on the Board of Governors. Professor May has served on the editorial review boards of the Journal of Management and Business Ethics Quarterly. In addition, he serves as an ad hoc reviewer for such journals as Administrative Science Quarterly, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Business and Society, and the Journal of Business Ethics. Finally, he received a Best Reviewer Award for his reviewing work from the Social Issues in Management Division of the Academy of Management in 2000.

Education

  • Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia
  • B.A., University of Kansas

Research

Overall, Professor May has two major streams of research and many current research projects span both streams. First, he is interested in business ethics. Specifically, he has investigated the role that moral intensity plays in ethical decision-making within job, environmental, information systems, educational, and healthcare contexts. Recent work in this stream has examined ethical work environments, positive emotions, and individuals' reactions to different forms of job-related harms. In addition, he received NSF funding to examine the effects of different models of integrating ethics into graduate science and engineering courses and a related project explored positive psychological outcomes (e.g., moral efficacy) in a quasi-experimental investigation of business ethics education.

Second, he is interested in how the design of jobs and work environments influences employees' work-related psychological states, attitudes, and health. In this stream, he has recently examined the impact of different work environments in the healthcare contexts on care provider and patient outcomes. He has also examined the determinants of employee engagement in their work. In particular, he is most interested in the psychological condition of meaningfulness in the work place and employee well-being. Finally, he has published a series of papers with colleagues that examined the positive role of self-efficacy in different organizational contexts.

Selected Publications

Chen, J. May, D. R., Schwoerer, C. E., & Augelli, B. (2018). Exploring the boundaries of career calling: The moderating roles of procedural justice and psychological safety. Journal of Career Development, 45(2), 103-116. DOI:10.1177/0894845316671214

Flinchbaugh, C. Schwoerer, C. E., & May, D. R. (2017). Helping yourself to help others: How cognitive change strategies improve employee reconciliation with service clients and positive work outcomes. Journal of Change Management, 17(3), 249-267.

Mencl, J. & May, D. R. (2016). An Exploratory Study among HRM Professionals of Moral Recognition in Off-Shoring Decisions: The Roles of Perceived Magnitude of Consequences, Time Pressure, Cognitive and Affective Empathy, and Prior Knowledge. Business and Society, 55(2), 246-270. DOI:10.1177/0007650312465150

Rathert, C. May, D. R., & Chung, H. S. (2016). Nurse moral distress: A survey identifying predictors and potential interventions. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 53, 39-49. DOI:10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2015.10.007

May, D. R., Chang, Y. K., & Shao, R. (2015). Does Ethical Membership Matter? Moral Identification and Its Organizational Implications. Journal of Applied Psychology , 100(3), 681-694. DOI:10.1037/a0038344

May, D. R., Luth, M. T., & Schwoerer, C. E. (2014). The Effects of Business Ethics Education on Moral Efficacy, Moral Meaningfulness, and Moral Courage: A Quasi-experimental Study. Journal of Business Ethics , 124, 67. DOI:10.1007/s10551-013-1860-6

May, D. R., Li, C. Mencl, J. & Huang, C. (2014). The Ethics of Meaningful Work: Types and Magnitude of Job-Related Harm and the Ethical Decision-Making Process. Journal of Business Ethics, 121(4), 651-669.

May, D. R., Luth, M. T., & Schwoerer, C. E. (2014). The influence of business ethics education on moral efficacy, moral meaningfulness, and moral courage: A quasi-experimental study. Journal of Business Ethics, 124(1), 67-80.

May, D. R., & Luth, M. T. (2013). The Effectiveness of Ethics Education: A Quasi-Experimental Field Study. Science and Engineering Ethics, 19(2), 545-568.

Luth, M. Patel, P. C., & May, D. R. (2012). Toward a multi-level framework of engagement and performance at work. In National Academy of Management Best Paper Electronic Proceedings.

Brown, F. W., & May, D. R. (2012). Organizational Change and Development: The Efficacy of Transformational Leadership Training. Journal of Management Development, 31(6), 520-536.

Flinchbaugh, C. L., Moore, W. G., Chang, Y. K., & May, D. R. (2012). Student well-being interventions: The effects of stress management techniques and gratitude journaling in the management education classroom. Journal of Management Education, 36(2), 191-219.

Rathert, C. May, D. R., & Williams, E. S. (2011). Beyond Service Quality: The Mediating Role of Patient Safety Perceptions in the Patient Experience – Satisfaction Relationship. Health Care Management Review, 36(4), 359-368.

Hannah, S. T., Avolio, B. J., & May, D. R. (2011). Moral Maturation and Moral Conation: A Capacity Approach to Explaining Moral Thought and Action. Academy of Management Review, 36(4), 663-685.

May, D. R., Luth, M. & Schwoerer, C. E. (2009). The Effects of Business Ethics Education on Moral Efficacy, Moral Meaningfulness, and Moral Courage: A Quasi-experimental Study. In National Academy of Management Best Paper Electronic Proceedings.

Rathert, C. Ishqaidef, G. & May, D. R. (2009). Creating a Person-Centered Workplace for Health Care Staff: What Can Managers Do? Journal of Healthcare Management, 54(1), 74.

Rathert, C. Ishquaidef, G. & May, D. R. (2009). Improving Work Environments in Health Care: Test of a Theoretical Framework. Health Care Management Review, 34(4), 334-343.

Mencl, J. & May, D. R. (2009). The Effects of Proximity and Empathy on Ethical Decision-Making: An Exploratory Investigation. Journal of Business Ethics, 85(2), 201-226.

Rathert, C. Ishqaidef, G. & May, D. R. (2008). Person-Centered Work Environments in Health Care: Preliminary Test of a Theoretical Framework. In National Academy of Management Best Paper Electronic Proceedings.

Pauli, K. P., Gilson, R. L., & May, D. R. (2007). Anxiety and Avoidance: The Mediating Effects of Computer Self-Efficacy on Computer Anxiety and Intention to Use Computers. Review of Business Information Systems Journal, 11(1), 57-64.

Rathert, C. & May, D. R. (2007). Health Care Work Environments, Employee Satisfaction, and Patient Safety: Care Provider Perspectives. Health Care Management Review, 32(1), 2-11.

Rathert, C. & May, D. R. (2007). Person-Centered Work Environments, Psychological Safety, and Positive Affect in Health Care: A Theoretical Framework. Organizational Ethics: Healthcare, Business, and Policy, 4(2), 109-125.

Gardner, W. L., Avolio, B. J., Luthans, F. May, D. R., & Walumbwa, F. O. (2005). "Can You See the Real Me?" A Self-Based Model of Authentic Leader and Follower Development. The Leadership Quarterly, 16(3), 343-372.

May, D. R., Oldham, G. R., & Rathert, C. (2005). Employee Affective and Behavioral Reactions to the Spatial Density of Physical Work Environments. Human Resource Management, 44(1), 21-33.

Schwoerer, C. E., May, D. R., Hollensbe, E. C., & Mencl, J. (2005). General and Specific Self-Efficacy in the Context of a Training Intervention to Enhance Performance Expectancy. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 16(1), 111-130.

Reed, K. Doty, D. H., & May, D. R. (2005). The Impact of Aging on Self-Efficacy and Computer Skill Acquisition. Journal of Managerial Issues, 17(2), 212-228.

Watley, L. D., & May, D. R. (2004). Enhancing Moral Intensity: The Roles of Personal and Consequential Information in Ethical Decision-Making. Journal of Business Ethics, 50, 105-126.

May, D. R., Reed, K. Schwoerer, C. E., & Potter, P. (2004). Ergonomic Office Design and Aging: A Quasi-experimental Longitudinal Field Study of Employee Reactions to an Ergonomic Intervention Program. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 9(2), 123-135.

Zhu, W. May, D. R., & Avolio, B. J. (2004). The Impact of Ethical Leadership Behavior on Employee Outcomes: The Roles of Psychological Empowerment and Authenticity. Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies, 11(1), 16-26.

May, D. R., Gilson, R. L., & Harter, L. M. (2004). The Psychological Conditions of Meaningfulness, Safety, and Availability and the Engagement of the Human Spirit at Work. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 77, 11-37.

Avolio, B. J., Gardner, W. L., Walumba, F. Luthans, F. & May, D. R. (2004). Unlocking the Mask: A Look at the Process by which Authentic Leaders Impact Follower Attitudes and Behaviors. The Leadership Quarterly, 15(6), 801-823.

May, D. R., Chan, A. L., Hodges, T. D., & Avolio, B. J. (2003). Developing the Moral Component of Authentic Leadership. Organizational Dynamics, 32(3), 247-260.

Pauli, K. P., May, D. R., & Gilson, R. L. (2003). Fun and Games: The Influence of a Playful Pre-Training Intervention and Microcomputer Playfulness on Computer-Related Performance. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 28(4), 407-424.

Pauli, K. P., & May, D. R. (2002). Ethics and the Digital Dragnet: Magnitude of Consequences, Accountability, and the Ethical Decision Making of Information System Professionals. In National Academy of Management Best Paper Electronic Proceedings.

Reitz, H. J., May, D. R., Schwoerer, C. E., & Houston, D. A. (2002). Multidisciplinary Spectacles for Blind Scholars Encountering the Elephant of Globalization. In International Association of Business and Society Proceedings (pp. 171-173).

May, D. R., & Pauli, K. P. (2002). The Role of Moral Intensity in Ethical Decision-Making: A Review and Investigation of Moral Recognition, Evaluation, and Intention . Business & Society, 41(1), 84-117.

Elm, D. R., May, D. R., Weaver, G. & Weber, J. (2000). Empirical Research in Business Ethics. In International Association of Business and Society Proceedings (pp. 6-10).

Flannery, B. L., & May, D. R. (2000). Environmental Ethical Decision Making in the U.S. Metal Finishing Industry. The Academy of Management Journal, 43(4), 642-662.

Flannery, B. L., & May, D. R. (1999). An Empirical Study of the Effect of Moral Intensity on Environmental Ethical Decision Making. In National Academy of Management Best Paper Electronic Proceedings.

Pauli, K. P., May, D. R., & Gilson, R. L. (1999). Motivation, Orientation, and Intention to Use Computers. In Midwest Academy of Management Electronic Proceedings.

Pauli, K. P. (1998). Computer Training and the Unsure Learner: A Theoretical Framework for the Influence of Pre-training Intervention, Self-Efficacy, and Microcomputer Playfulness on Computer Related Performance. In Midwest Academy of Management Electronic Proceedings.

Gilson, R. L., & May, D. R. (1998). Creativity in Work Groups: The Influence of Task Interdependence and Task Routineness on Group Support for Creativity. In Midwest Academy of Management Electronic Proceedings.

Schwoerer, C. E., May, D. R., & Hollensbe, E. (1998). General and Specific Self-Efficacy: Their Roles in a Training Intervention. In Midwest Academy of Management Electronic Proceedings.

Reed, K. & May, D. R. (1998). New Age Technology and New Aged Workers: The Impact of Age on Computer Skill Acquisition and the Influence of Technological Self-Efficacy, Age-Related Beliefs, and Change Attitudes. In Midwest Academy of Management Electronic Proceedings.

Peterson, S. J., & May, D. R. (1998). Who Am I and What Do I Feel? Self-Identity and Emotional Engagement at Work. In Midwest Academy of Management Electronic Proceedings.

Reed, K. & May, D. R. (1997). Shifting from the Fountain of Youth to Old Faithful: Training an Aging Work Force. In Midwest Academy of Management Electronic Proceedings (31st ed., Vol. 1, pp. 1-27).

May, D. R., Reed, C. E., Schwoerer, C. E., & Potter, P. (1997). Employee Reactions to Ergonomic Job Design: The Moderating Effects of Health Locus of Control and Self-Efficacy. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 2(1), 11-24.

Reed, K. May, D. R., & Waskel, S. (1996). Alice through the Computer Screen: Older Women Workers and Computer Technologies. In Midwest Academy of Management Electronic Proceedings (8th ed., Vol. 1, pp. 1-16).

Flannery, B. L., & May, D. R. (1996). The Moderating Effects of Moral Intensity on the Individual and Contextual Determinants of Environmental Ethical Decision-Making (A Theoretical Framework). In National Academy of Management Best Paper Electronic Proceedings, 2, ONE Division, 1-6.

Schwoerer, C. E., & May, D. R. (1996). Age and Work-Related Outcomes: The Moderating Effects of Self-Efficacy and Tool Design Effectiveness. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 17(5), 469-487.

May, D. R., & Flannery, B. L. (1995). Using Employee Involvement Teams to Develop and Implement Waste Minimization Approaches. In Decision Sciences Institute Proceedings (Vol. 1, pp. 350-352).

May, D. R., & Flannery, B. L. (1995). Cutting Waste with Employee Involvement Teams. Business Horizons, 38(5), 28-38.

Schwoerer, C. E., May, D. R., & Rosen, B. (1995). Organizational Characteristics and HRM Policies on Rights: Exploring the Connections. Journal of Business Ethics, 14(7), 531-549.

Riley, M. W., Cochran, D. J., May, D. R., Schwoerer, C. E., & Stentz, T. L. (1994). Case Study #1: Final Report for the Cooperative Agreement for the Demonstration of an Ergonomic Intervention in the Red Meat-Packing Industry at Farmland Foods, Inc., Denison, Iowa. In C. C. Gjessing, T. F. Schoenborn, & A. Cohen (Eds.), Participatory Ergonomic Interventions in Meatpacking Plants (pp. 51-91). Cincinnati, OH: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HDSS), Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

May, D. R., & Patrick, R. R. (1994). Workforce Diversity and the Symbolic Physical Environment. In Midwest Academy of Management Proceedings (pp. 67-72).

May, D. R., & Schwoerer, C. E. (1994). Developing Effective Work Teams: Guidelines to Fostering Work Team Efficacy. Organization Development Journal, 12(3), 29-39.

May, D. R., & Schwoerer, C. E. (1994). Employee Health by Design: Using Employee Involvement Teams in Ergonomic Job Redesign. Personnel Psychology, 47(4), 861-876.

Schaubroeck, J. May, D. R., & Brown, F. W. (1994). Procedural Justice Explanations and Employee Reactions to Economic Hardship: A Field Experiment. Journal of Applied Psychology, 79(3), 455-460.

Flannery, B. L., & May, D. R. (1994). Prominent Factors Influencing Environmental Leadership: Application of a Theoretical Model in the Waste Management Industry. Leadership Quarterly, 5, 201-221.

Flannery, B. L., & May, D. R. (1993). Organizations and Pro-environmental Behaviors: A Model for Future Research. In Southern Management Association Proceedings (pp. 453-455).

Schaubroeck, J. May, D. R., & Brown, F. W. (1993). Procedural Justice Explanations and Employee Reactions to Economic Hardship: A Field Experiment. In National Academy of Management Best Papers Proceedings (pp. 258-261).

Nelson, J. L., Sebora, T. C., & May, D. R. (1993). Retaining CEO Decision-Making Power: Cooptation and Board Committee Demography. In Decision Sciences Institute Proceedings (Vol. 1, pp. 532-534).

Whetten, D. A., Windes, D. L., May, D. R., & Bookstaver, D. (1991). Bringing Management Skill Education into the Mainstream. In J. D. Bigelow (Ed.), Managerial Skills (pp. 23-40). Beverly Hills, CA: Sage Publications.

Sniezek, J. A., & May, D. R. (1990). Conflict of Interests and Commitment in Groups. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 20(14), 1150-1165.

Sniezek, J. A., May, D. R., & Sawyer, J. (1990). Social Uncertainty and Interdependence: A Study of Resource Allocation Decisions in Groups. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 46(2), 155-180.


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